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Posted 09 November 2013 21:45


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This website gives a rating based on a list of critic reviews. General public can also write their personal review.

http://www.metacritic.com/music/moon-landing/james-blunt

Post #241804
Posted 11 November 2013 14:04


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http://www.mxdwn.com/2013/11/08/reviews/james-blunt-moon-landing/

mxdwn.com
November 8th, 2013
By Thomas Gregorich

More Beautiful Blunt

James Blunt’s Moon Landing has all the heartfelt vulnerability you’d expect from the fellow who sang, “Goodbye My Lover,” on Oprah. But if you thought Blunt could only pull off sentimental tearjerkers like his 2005 hit single, you’re only half right. That’s just where he excels. Blunt’s latest album is proof that he can be a pop act, too, with a full band. But we can’t commence to sorrowing quite as readily as we’d like to, with all that drum and bass and those catchy melodies.

This is Blunt for the Now Generation. He’s sped up the tempo, embraced simple but catching melodies, stylized his vocals. The punchy pop piano song, “Heart to Heart,” has enough whoas and jaunty handclaps to make The Lumineers feel flattered. “Bones” has a steadily pounding beat, warm synth strings and piano chords that ring out dramatically until the explosive chorus. It’s all quite stylish. But when Blunt repeats certain phrases like “Can you feel it, feel it, feel it?” one can’t help but suspect he’s modeling his vocals after Ellie Goulding. By following the lead of today’s hottest stars, Blunt falls off the path down which we would sadly, gladly follow him.

Despite its desire to sound popular, Moon Landing has down-to-earth, touching moments where Blunt shines. “Sun on Sunday” is the kind of stripped down piano ballad we want from him; the kind that will make your heart hurt if you let it. The song climaxes with a Celine Dion-style key change that is as subtle as a Celine Dion-style key change can be. Cue sneezing into a kleenex.

Blunt’s standout attribute is not exactly a musical one. He’s profoundly sincere; that is, he sounds like he feels every word he sings. That’s why he’s most affecting when acoustic. The best way to accentuate his heartfelt voice is with silence. There’s a perfect example of this on Moon Landing. Blunt, perhaps aware of his strength as an acoustic performer, and not wanting to abandon that completely for a more radio-friendly sound, included two versions of “Miss America.” This is his tribute to the late Whitney Houston, with whom he shares an uncanny ability to cause uncomfortable swelling in the throat. One version features a band, sweeping strings and background vocals. Then there’s an acoustic version, a mere bonus track, featuring Blunt and his piano. If only it were songs like this heartbreakingly candid rendition that Blunt chose to place under the spotlight, perhaps Moon Landing would feel more grounded.

Post #241904
Posted 11 November 2013 16:52
Supreme Being

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Basically there are two types of critics.
Those who do their job ie give their expert opinion and justify it, which is, after all, what they are paid to do. I respect them, whether I agree with them or not.
Those who never lived up to their great expectations, resent successful people and are just out for a bit of stoning. They don't even irritate me because when all is said and done they only embarrass themselves.

This said, I'm hardly bowled over by Moon Landing. But then I'm not an expert, just an amateur music lover .
Post #241907
Posted 11 November 2013 17:52
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 “Sun on Sunday” is the kind of stripped down piano ballad we want from him; the kind that will make your heart hurt if you let it.

Blunt’s standout attribute is not exactly a musical one. He’s profoundly sincere; that is, he sounds like he feels every word he sings. That’s why he’s most affecting when acoustic. The best way to accentuate his heartfelt voice is with silence.


I agree completely with these two comments from this review.  Thanks for posting it jbfan.
Post #241912
Posted 15 November 2013 21:11


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http://soundandmotionmag.com/2013/11/12/album-review-james-blunt-moon-landing/

Sound and Motion Magazine
November 12, 2013
Samantha Swan

James Blunt, considered to be one of the most hated men in the music business is back with his fourth studio album Moon Landing. Apparently three albums are not enough for this English songwriter. You would think all the negative criticism this man gets for his music would be enough to put anyone off the industry, but is this man, truly as bad as so many make him out to be? Is he a bad singer? Is he a bad writer, or is his music simply to corny for the music market in this day and age. It seems unless people are rapping and singing about sleeping with a hundred girls in a week, it’s not cool.

When you think about a moon landing, it is often considered to be quite an exciting operation, a tense moment in time where only a handful of people in history can witness the awe that is the moon close up. Therefore with a title called Moon Landing you would expect an album of beauty and feelings of wonder, which is pretty much what you get. The songs are easy to listen to either outside on a warm sunny day, or even indoors raining where you can drift off into a euphoric world of peace and calm.

The opening track on the album Face the Sun has such beauty and elegance surrounding it, as it sends the listener into an almost trance like feel as you take a look at the sun through the eyes of James Blunt. It reminds you how beautiful our world can be when you look hard enough, and Blunt has captured this feeling in the song with his voice and the instruments used to express his emotions of the universe.

The tracks on the album Moon Landing vary from slow emotional rides through life to quirky, upbeat songs that will have you clicking your fingers, if you are not careful. Satellites, Bonfire Heart, Heart to Heart and Postcards are a most welcomed uplift to the album that show Blunt can do more than just a slow love song, but still easy on the ears. Miss America would be a great single to release from the album as it sounds like a journey through a magical Garden of Eden especially with the harp playing during the opening of the song.

However, not every song on the album is a winner and it is rare to find an album with a complete collection of fantastic songs that excite the listener from start to finish. The Only One drags, while Blue On Blue generates an overwhelming feeling when what you have witnessed has finally sunk in and you have to get back to the norm of everyday life. It simple terms, it bums you out, rather than wanting more.

Nonetheless, when you compare James Blunt to the likes of Justin Bieber and Pharrell Williams, he has emotion; he has the ability to write compelling songs that bring you into the song, on a more personal level. He can sing. He is not necessarily the best male singer in current times, but he can sing and he can write, which gives him more opportunity to give his input into a song. He is older and wiser than his younger counterparts and therefore understands his limits, understands what he wants and understands contracts, so not to get roped into releasing manufactured rubbish that is not his style.

Overall, James Blunt has a good album under his belt, and it’s good to see he is sticking to his roots and not trying to be like everybody else. He uses instruments the whole way through the album instead of a load of techno beats that can be created with a computer. It fills the album with real emotion, even if it is not to everybody’s taste.

Post #242038
Posted 16 November 2013 13:10
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Great review as even the more critical parts are justified. A job well done and all in all a tribute to James.
Post #242044
Posted 01 December 2013 00:40


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This review is counted in the score on Metacritic website.

Uncut, Issue 199, December 2013, page 66

James Blunt, Moon Landing
6/10

The return of the singing soldier

Calling a song "Always Hate Me" suggests that the much maligned Blunt has, at least, a sense of humour. His fourth album is unlikely to convert the legions of naysayers, but some sparks of invention penetrate the blanket of aural blandness and vapidly anthemic pop. "Miss America" recalls classic Elton John, right down to the lyric about a doomed performer (rumoured to be Whitney Houston), "Sun On Sunday" is a tender piano ballad, and post-Mumfords hoedown "Bonfire Heart" is good fun. Most diverting of all is the epic showstopper "Blue On Blue", proving that if Blunt pushed himself a little harder he could be an altogether more interesting proposition.

Graeme Thomson

Post #242785
Posted 03 December 2013 03:20


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Written by PARIS365 (based in the United States)

A part-time entertainment journalist for over 15 years, Michael McCarthy was a columnist and contributing editor for the magazines Lollipop and LiveWire. He co-created and wrote for Cinezine, one of the '90's most popular movie E-zines. The only time he's not listening to music is when he's watching television shows and movies.

~~~

http://www.loveispop.com/reviews/albumoftheday-review-james-blunt-moon-landing/

#ALBUMOFTHEDAY REVIEW: JAMES BLUNT: MOON LANDING

Although he’s always maintained a moderate level of popularity in Europe, James Blunt is still known as a one-hit wonder here in the States. His hit? 2004′s inescapable “You’re Beautiful,” a song which critics loathed but the masses adored. I always found it amusing that it became such a bit hit because on the album the lyric actually goes “you’re fucking beautiful.” So, thousands of people who bought the album expecting the sweet song they heard on the radio were treated to a profanity-laced version instead. You have to admit that’s pretty funny, that all of these middle-aged housewives who thought he was some sweet little Brit bought the album for that song they heard him do on daytime television only to discover that the album version was full of the F-word. But what I liked most about “You’re Beautiful” was the simple fact that it was a lovely, sentimental ballad and that album version with the F-word was brutally honest.

Apparently knowing that ballads are what he does best, Blunt opens “Moon Landing” with such a song, “Face The Sun.” But first we hear the sound of a motorcycle driving by. You’d think we’d hear the sound of a moon landing or space shuttle launching or something to that effect, given the album’s title, but, no, we’re treated to the sound of a motorcycle. That said, that motorcycle is the only blemish on the otherwise perfect song. If you liked “You’re Beautiful” or any of Blunt’s other ballads, you’re sure to fall head over heels for this one, which finds Blunt singing tenderly, laying his heart bare, during the slightly melancholic verses. It’s not an entirely depressing song, however. It’s actually meant to inspire one to carry on, if I’m interpreting it correctly. “And God knows it’s hard to find the one / But in time, all the flowers turn to face the sun,” goes the uplifting chorus. And after we hear that chorus the second time, drums crash into the picture and guitars erupt with fervor and it proves to be quite the epic song.

The mid-tempo tune “Satellites” begins with flourishes of strings and an R&B-flavored beat before James gets sentimental. “It seems that everyone we know / Is out there waiting by a phone / Wondering why they feel alone in this life,” goes the bridge. The chorus wonders if we’re all just satellites before, “For all we know life’s just a dream / Who the hell knows what it means / Stop the world and sing with me.” To be sure, it’s a bit more laid-back than your average sing-along song, but it’s no less likeable for that.

If you are on the market for something you can sing-along to, you’re sure to dig the lead single “Bonfire Heart,” which meshes Mumford-style percussion and earnestness with a big chorus straight out of pop 101. That it’s pop-infused should come as no surprise as the track was co-written by Blunt and hit-maker Ryan Tedder, who also produced the track. “People like us / We don’t need that much / Just someone that starts, starts the spark in our bonfire hearts,” goes the first part of the chorus, which you might find yourself singing along to the very first time you listen to it.

The very next song also has heart in the title. It’s called “Heart To Heart” and it’s just as peppy and contagious as “Bonfire Heart,” which probably has something to do with the fact that it was co-produced and co-written by Daniel Omelio, otherwise known as Robopop, who’s worked on such gems as Maroon 5′s “Payphone” and Lana Del Rey’s “Video Games.” “You should know / We see eye to eye, heart to heart,” concludes the insistent chorus. But what really makes the song is the call and response style of the verses, which has Blunt’s lead and backing vocals going back and forth, as though he’s having a conversation with himself.

The album’s saddest song — in a good way — is “Miss America,” which is about the late Whitney Houston. “Did someone give you something to help you ease the pain? / Like the liquor in the bottle, we watched you slip away,” goes the sentimental beginning, which Blunt sings tenderly. But halfway through the song it grows even more dramatic — as it erupts like “Face The Sun” — with boisterous drums, blazing guitars and potent strings. “There’s another voice singing in heaven’s choir tonight / To fill the silence left behind / And I don’t know what goes on in your mind / But I’m sure it’s enough to make you cry,” Blunt sings, almost angrily. Clearly, he was quite distressed by Houston’s downfall and eventual death and he holds nothing back here. Unfortunately, the quiet moments here are probably too downtrodden for pop radio here in the States, but I can see this being a huge hit in the rest of the world.

Elsewhere, “The Only One” is like Blunt attempting to do a Maroon 5 song, though it wasn’t co-written by Robopop but Wayne Hector, the man responsible for almost all 30 of Westlife’s hits, including seven number ones. Also noteworthy is “Sun On Sunday,” a slow, piano ballad that remains soft and vulnerable throughout the song, never erupting into something grandiose like the other ballads on the album. And by that point you’re sure to find the nuanced little song refreshing.

Blunt might not reinvent the wheel here, but he’s clearly at the top of his game and it turns out he can make some fucking beautiful songs.

Post #242854
Posted 03 December 2013 08:43


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Thank you for that brilliant review. We Blunty types are quite liberal though and I don't recall anyone moaning on here about the use of the f word. I loved it at the time and was always disappointed when i heard the flying word.
Post #242855
Posted 04 December 2013 07:45
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Emphasis on profanity in You´re Beautiful... that´s a different perspective.

Thanks for posting. I enjoy reading reviews from the US.
Post #242890
Posted 04 December 2013 17:07
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You're Beautiful has one profanity, when he says "I was f...ing high, then on tv and elsewhere he says' flying high' and in concerts he let's the audience sing it. That amount of profanity I can take.
Post #242901
Posted 08 December 2013 02:45


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This one is good to read.

http://www.integratedalliances.com/oddsandends/linkedin-rockstar-music-review-james-blunt-moon-landing

LinkedIn Rockstar Music Review – James Blunt Moon Landing
by MIKE O'NEIL on DECEMBER 7, 2013
in ODDS AND ENDS

It was 2006 when I became a true James Blunt fan and I remember it very well. I was living in downtown Denver and, almost by accident, I strolled by the Paramount Theater. It was early April, about 5:30 and there was a buzz about the place.

Downtown Denver is always buzzing in April anyhow and the Paramount Theater is ground zero. I looked around and saw these people that looked a lot like me and my friends. They were excited as heck and it rubbed off on me. I was in!

I know a few buying ticket tricks and I ended up sitting right in front of the sound booth – nothing better for an audiophile and concert veteran like me.

Blunt would appear in Denver 5 times in a few years. In fact, I ended up in Row 6 just 6 months later. How different could the shows be? One in downtown Denver and another at the University of Denver campus. Quite frankly, it wasn’t much different. Different tours are a different story though.

James Blunt has found the razor and its effect is stunning (see below). I went the way of the razor 3 years ago after decades of “Sonny Crocket” myself. When the beard starts turning white, it’s time!

His debut album, “Out of Bedlam”, had one really BIG hit – “You’re Beautiful”. It would be followed by even more powerful material with “All the Lost Souls” and “Some Kind of Trouble”. Blunts music gets better and better with continued listening as you uncover something new each time you listen.

On October 18, 2013, James Blunt released “Moon Landing”. It’s a true contender for best yet, but you decide. I’ll make it just a little easier for you here with a twist – WATCH James Blunt. He has lots of great videos, complete with alternate versions.

James Blunt Moon Landing is a terrific piece of work and it too is led by an instant classic, “Miss America”, a tribute to the late, great Whitney Houston.

“Did someone give you something to help you ease the pain, like the liquor in the bottle, they watched you slip away…always surrounded but alone …did the make-up never make up for the scars behind your eyes…nothings free Miss America”.

Blunt’s falsetto comes in and out but it is strongest on Miss America. It’s almost magical, a voice is truly a finely tuned musical instrument. You can’t miss it!

Moon Landing Songology (with links to YouTube videos):

Face the Sun – all flowers learn how to face the sun!
Satellites – are we satellites or are we connected somehow?
Bonfire Heart – his first use of “gang vocals”, very strong
Heart to Heart – classic Blunt love song that rocks
Miss America – clearly the strongest of the strong tracks, full band backing
The Only One – another classic Blunt love song that rocks
Sun on Sunday – the only throwaway track
Bones – do you feel it in your bones? You will!
Always Hate Me – grt song but don’t listen “deeply” with your spouse!
Postcards – really catchy reggae-type tune
Blue on Blue – Builds into a huge crescendo!
Miss America (Acoustic) – simply beautiful, instant effect, haunting

So, listen for yourself or view for yourself. You just might consider putting James Blunt’s Moon Landing on your wish list or maybe even on your “give list” this holiday season.

BONUS – take a listen to James Blunt’s version of Young Folks, a super catchy European song that I am sure you’ve heard before. I use it as a wake up song when my partner is a little groggy getting up! Hear the original version of Young Folks by Peter Bjorn and John.

Post #243007
Posted 08 December 2013 03:33


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I quite like this review....nice lines drawn from B2B --> Moon Landing.

I love that he mentions the cover of 'Young Folks' as a must-hear. When James doesn't 'muck' up the lyrics, his cover of that song is absolutely amazing and worth the mention.
Post #243009
Posted 08 December 2013 03:42


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I don't know if all the people registered on LinkedIn got an alert to read this review, but I've never seen a music review tweeted and retweeted so many times in such a short period. Dozen and dozen of times within an hour. I guess that tomorrow it will be many hundreds of times. This is a very good publicity for James in the United States particularly.

A bit of info on Twitter about the author Mike O'Neil:

Mike O'Neil
@MikeONeilRocks
♫ The LinkedIn Rockstar ♫ #RockTheWorld Author & Radio Host | #LinkedIn Sales Trainer | #SocialMedia Speaker Authority Visionary Celebrity ♫ \klas-ik-rokr'/ ♫

Minneapolis, Minnesota · MikeIsOnline.com

Post #243011
Posted 18 January 2014 22:03


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Music & Musicians (U.S. magazine based in California)
Issue 31, November 2013, p. 68

Moon Landing Review
by Linda Laban

With "You're Beautiful", James Blunt scored one of the biggest hit singles of this millennium. Arriving nearly a decade later, the British singer-songwriter's fourth album doesn't stray from his signature emotive and simple pop. True to his name, Blunt gets straight to the point, rushing on each song toward some kind of hook or spiraling melodic line. He often hits the mark, as with the irresistibly soaring "Bonfire Heart", but he's often trite, and on the plodding ballad "Blue on Blue", he's downright clumsy. His cracked, haunted voice is most effective on songs about girls he can neither live with nor without, and "Miss America" is about the late Whitney Houston. "I've never been a beautiful boy, never liked the sound of my own voice," he sings on the seemingly autobiographical "Bones", a virile anthem about not taking life or yourself too seriously and just getting on with it. Maybe that's his secret.

Post #244857
Posted 26 January 2014 03:56


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Whether we agree or not with this music critic, it's far from being a lazy one. And it's written by a student, not someone paid for. I'm impressed!

http://musicandlistening.blogspot.ca/2014/01/james-blunt-moon-landing-album-review.html

Thank You For The Music

Daily Reviews of albums by different artists from random years. Just another person offering their views but in a detailed, track by track way, going against the instantenous music situation of today.

Blogger's name: chrissymusic
Student in English Literature
Chester-le-street, Durham, U.K.

Thursday, 23 January 2014
James Blunt - Moon Landing Album Review

Since bursting onto the scene back in 2004/2005 thanks to his breakout hit ‘You’re Beautiful’, James Blunt has been a really successful singer songwriter who has amazingly gone from ex-army man to an internationally recognised artist. With his new album Moon Landing, Blunt has definitely seen a renewed level of success, as the records lead single ‘Bonfire Heart’ became the singers highest charting hit in the UK music charts for some time, reaching number 4 in the charts. But was that hit song just a fluke, or is Moon Landing actually quite the brilliant album?

Track 1- Face the Sun

Face the Sun is a slow burning, ballad opening for the album that finds the singer in passionate, uplifting music territory that many people have come to know him for. The song finds Blunt telling us about how life is hard, but things can become better, and he uses the idea of flowers facing the sun to express how you will find the one at some point in life. The lyrics are very soppy but sweet, and with the delicacy of the singer’s vocal performance the song feels quite sincere and nice, whilst Blunt has that warming, light tone that really works for him and which reminds you of why he became such a big hit so many years ago. Producer Tom Rothrock does a nice job in slowly building up the power of the song’s sound from simple piano to a stomping, pop rock edged, stadium rousing final minute that makes this a good opening for the record, and probably a good start for the singers live shows.

3.5/5

Track 2- Satellites

With the snappy string arrangement and nice backbeat that punctuates the song, Satellites is a quirky pop rock ditty that finds the singer addressing society and some of its problems. Within the track Blunt sings of how people are consumed by technology and how this is a really bad thing for society. The lyrics are definitely clichéd and don’t really say anything that interesting, but the song is quite catchy with the ‘oh oh oh’ hook and the way that the singer doesn’t have to subtly tell you what his point is. With Blunt’s light vocal performance the song feels fresh and airy and nicely feels like Blunt is definitely moving away from technology, and with the blend of instruments used in the production, this is a sweet pop ditty that does what it sets out to do.

3.5/5

Track 3- Bonfire Heart

Lead single Bonfire Heart was co-written and produced by One Republic frontman and hit song maker Ryan Tedder, and sees Blunt simply tell this person that they make him feel so good because they simply love him. The song utilises this fire metaphor to nice effect, and although some of the lyrics feel terribly clichéd, the folk pop driven chorus is instantly catchy and memorable, and makes you feel quite happy in listening to it. Blunt gives us a vocal performance that is nicely controlled but still full of passion, and the simple quality of the vocals make the song seem honest and sweet. Tedder does a good job with the production with his blend of folk driven guitar riffs with undercutting drum beats that just creates this uplifting tone for the track, making this a good choice of a single.

3.5/5

Track 4- Heart to Heart

Continuing on from the last track, Heart to Heart finds Blunt telling this person once again that there love is great and how he is there if they need him, because their hearts are seemingly intertwined. The message is instantly catchy with a nice uncertain but strong relationship dynamic within the lyrics. The singer’s vocals are sharp and simple and makes the song nicely get to the point, but the production of the song is definitely more interesting. This is because the tracks sound utilises more of a jaunty musical rhythm with plenty of hand claps, making this another song that will sound great live, and which creates a slightly different musical avenue for the singer (albeit really not that different).

Track 5- Miss America

Revealed by Blunt to be a tribute to the late singer Whitney Houston, Miss America is a piano led ballad that focuses on Blunt singing of feeling like he knew Houston through her songs, and how she will be in the hearts of the people forever. The song is lyrically clichéd, but the sweet nature of the song is nice to listen to, and with the singer rich voice, the sense of love for this woman feels more sincere and heartfelt. Production wise the track is really strong, transforming from this soft piano piece to a stomping rock effort filled with this great electric guitar riff that captures the passion and intensity of the songs lyrical emotions.

3.5/5

Track 6- The Only One

From the tribute of Miss America we turn to a more typical James Blunt type of song with The Only One, a relationship based track in which the singer addresses the fact that he has messed up in this relationship, but the singer has told this girl all his secrets, and to him she is the person he is meant to be with all of his life. The song lyrically once again edges into cliché, but the singer still manages to make the cliché not sound really terrible, with the chorus being quite catchy in its intensity. The singer’s vocals are really strong has he adds some depth to the chorus and uses the range of his voice well. The blend of the piano and the pounding beats creates a simple but emotive sound for the song that harks back to Blunt’s Back to Bedlam success, so he wants a weepy love single, then this wouldn’t be a bad choice.

3.5/5

Track 7- Sun on Sunday

Beginning with just this really delicate piano melody, Sun on Sunday is a song that is immediately positioned as a teary ballad. Here we find Blunt singing of how he can’t believe that he couldn’t see this person’s pain, and he just asks if he can help this person, because he hurts if they hurt. On this occasion the clichéd quality of the lyrics is unavoidable, and the song doesn’t have the right amount of impact in the way that the lyrics should. Although the singer’s voice is great within this really stripped back setting, the way that the production uses this simple piano line and some strings is another element of cliché for the track, making this more of a sub-par ballad.

3/5

Track 8- Bones

Bones is a really intriguing pop number that opens up with this really frenzied guitar line that immediately commands your attention after the last track. The song focuses on Blunt singing about his life and how he hasn’t always been great or confident, but this person makes him feel so good. The song is a feisty slice of pop that has this rushing chorus that is so catchy and powerful, whilst the singer vocally sits very comfortably within the track and sounds like a man just enjoying life. The production is really strong with the use of pulsing pop rhythms and vibrant drums, creating a great sound, and overall this song is great and must be a future single.

4/5

Track 9- Always Hate Me

After the happiness and adrenaline rush of the previous track we are treated to Always Hate Me, a break up song that finds the singer expressing how he has hurt this girl and because of this she will always hate him. The song is nice in its simplicity, but does have a slight clichéd narrative quality that makes it seem as if the singer has pulled his lyrics from a film. However, Blunt’s voice is great with this track, as his high pitched tone makes the vulnerable and sad quality of the song that bit more tangible. The sound is simple but dramatic with some booming bass notes, strings and a steady piano line that just creates a slightly forceful but ultimately simple sound that works well.

3.5/5

Track 10- Postcards

Postcards is another track that lyrically has more of a narrative led quality, as the singer paints this picture of a love story in which he sends postcards to his girl to show his feelings. The song is a jaunty, folk pop offering that features this lovely acoustic guitar riff that is infectiously jolly, and this joyous tone of the song works really well with the softness of the singer’s voice. The lyrics have a very middle of the road quality to them, but Blunt has enough charisma to pull off the song and keep you invested, with the final minute being a really uplifting moment with a great use of electric guitar.

3.5/5

Track 11- Blue on Blue

Final track Blue on Blue finds the singer in his usual emotive state. Here we find Blunt asking what he has to do to get through to this girl, as it is sad for him that this girl doesn’t see how much he wants her. The song doesn’t get really far lyrically, and on this occasion the vocals aren’t that strong. Whilst the verses allow Blunt’s voice to shine, the chorus features an annoying, layered style of vocal that just doesn’t work. The acoustic guitar led sound also doesn’t really do much for the track, with the build up to more of a pop rock stadium sound just feeling very clichéd, and so this is more of a bland finish to the record than a nice end.

2.5/5

Final Review

Moon Landing is an accomplished set of nice folk, pop and rock tracks that show this singer has really mastered his craft. The production is sophisticated and slick whilst the lyrics are catchy, even though at times things are too clichéd. At the centre of it all comes Blunt’s great vocals, and although many people critic him for it, the singer just has this distinctive voice that is emotive and which works well, and this album really shows that he knows how to use his voice to the best effect. Moon Landing is fun, definitely worth a listen, and will definitely see the singer have continued success (especially if he releases Bones as a single)

8/10

Best Track- Bones
Worst Track- Blue on Blue
Post #245324
Posted 18 October 2018 14:11


Supreme Being

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It's Moon Landing 5th anniversary today... it was about time that I read and post this excellent review.

http://scottholleran.com/music/music-review-moon-landing-by-james-blunt/

Music Review: ‘Moon Landing’ by James Blunt
by Scott Holleran on January 1, 2014

James Blunt’s well crafted new pop rock album is his best work yet.

Moon Landing is in turns haunting, soulful and refreshingly romantic and optimistic. It’s the perfect new year’s pop album, though it was released last fall. With somber ballads, infectious pop and lyricism loaded with piano-laden, guitar-licking hooks, Blunt follows up the previous album, Some Kind of Trouble, with more of the same thoughtful, appealing and meaningful music. Listen for his always clear and coherent vocals on each of the 10 neatly composed songs. If you think today’s music is whiny, noisy and foggy, his fourth studio album will satisfy.

Every tune is excellent and I can’t really pick any standouts or turkeys. Some songs are slow. Some songs are fast. All of them are original to his style – if you don’t care for his falsetto voice, don’t go near the record – which is sincere, sentimental and sometimes cliched. What distinguishes Moon Landing from his Back to Bedlam, All the Lost Souls and Some Kind of Trouble is an artistic progression toward a higher, grander status as a pop star, delivering more focussed upbeat rock tunes that demonstrate a maturity worthy of a 1970s-era Elton John, especially on “Bones” and the sweet “Heart to Heart”.

I get the impression that combat veteran Blunt, who was famously ridiculed and vilified by cynics such as the Saturday Night Live cast when he broke out and profited from his hugely popular early hits (“You’re Beautiful”), doesn’t give a damn what others think. As he writes on the lilting “Postcards”:

I’m sending postcards from my heart,
With love for a postmark and then,
You’ll know that you make me,
Feel like we’ve been caught.
Like kids in the school-yard again.
And I can’t keep it to myself.
Can’t spell it any better,
L-O-V-E forever.
I hope you know that I’m,
Sending a postcard,
I don’t care who sees what I’ve said.
Or if the whole world knows what’s in my head.

Here again he displays romanticism with pride and the songs are more insistent, finished and memorable. Few artists weave solitude and loneliness into penetrating melodies as well as James Blunt, who co-wrote every tune. Heartache is threaded throughout the recording, even when he’s singing about falling or being in love, such as on “Bonfire Love”. It’s a lovely song which, like much of Moon Landing, is arranged, polished and sugared to confection. I’m well aware that this is a drawback to many if not most modern listeners, who prefer pain, torture and suffering in pop idols (Adele’s appeal comes to mind), not that there’s an absence of that on this or Blunt’s previous work. But it’s his sincerity, his seriousness, that the detractors hate about James Blunt. On Moon Landing, he counters with nothing but sobriety, love and light. Don’t miss listening to the tragic “Miss America”, which is Blunt’s tribute to Whitney Houston, his biting “Always Hate Me” and “Satellites”, insightful commentary on how misuse of technology distorts intimacy. “Face the Sun” is also a special song unto itself.

Post #286946
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