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Moon Landing - Reviews Expand / Collapse
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Posted 19 October 2013 09:15
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I really dont get it, why news papers hate him so much...

Guardian 2/5 !! http://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/oct/17/james-blunt-moon-landing-review

Time Out 2/5 !! http://www.timeout.com/london/music/james-blunt-moon-landing-album-review

The Independent 2/5 !! http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/music/reviews/album-review-james-blunt-moon-landing-custardatlantic-8887390.html

Post #240111
Posted 19 October 2013 14:43
Supreme Being

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Not brilliant reviews I agree, Lophorina, but at least it gave me an opportunity to add something a bit more positive in the comments section.  I guess you can't please everyone, but thanks for drawing it to our attention, maybe a few more positive comments would redress the balance a bit.
Post #240136
Posted 19 October 2013 17:11


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I haven't got the links, but I've seen:

Evening Standard - 4 stars out of 5
Daily Mail - 4 stars out of 5
The Sun - 4 stars out of 5
Post #240151
Posted 19 October 2013 18:43


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Billy

Here is the evening standard one:

http://www.standard.co.uk/goingout/music/album-reviews-october-2013-8859042.html

Daily Mail

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2465460/Albums-week-After-split-Russell-Brand-Katy-Perry-best-says-ADRIAN-THRILLS.html

It is nice to see some positive reviews.
Post #240157
Posted 19 October 2013 19:50


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Billy (19/10/2013)
I haven't got the links, but I've seen:

Evening Standard - 4 stars out of 5
Daily Mail - 4 stars out of 5
The Sun - 4 stars out of 5


I know they are not the most reliable authorities in music critic but it's very unusual for them to give such a high rate to James' work.

Post #240169
Posted 19 October 2013 20:13


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Thanks for the links Jayne - great to read some positive reviews
Post #240173
Posted 19 October 2013 20:14
Supreme Being

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These reviews make much nicer reading.

On the whole Moon Landing seems to be very well received by a lot of critics - looks like it's going to do really well - it certainly deserves to be a big success!
Post #240174
Posted 20 October 2013 09:54


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I found another review by The arts desk but it is another negative review I am afraid. One thing I would say is a lot of artists seem to make their best music when they are really struggling and have something they want to convey usually in the earlier days of their career. That is why to me James music is at its very peak in songs like Same Mistake and Your beautiful. There is something very powerful about theses songs. There is no doubt that James is now very skilled at producing pop songs and I will really enjoy and love playing this new CD and it probably is his best yet.
Post #240224
Posted 20 October 2013 12:38
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Entertainment Focus think it's one of the top ten albums of the year:

[url=http://www.entertainment-focus.com/music-review/james-blunt-moon-landing-album-review/]
Post #240232
Posted 20 October 2013 14:00


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Heartening to read that one Pippin. Good to know there are still some open minded folk out there who aren't influenced by the usual negativity.

Even if it's not their taste in music it shouldn't stop critics writing a balanced review.

What's that saying? There's no good or bad music, just music you enjoy and music you don't.

Noticed Moon Landing got 4 stars in one of the other reviews - the same as Paul McCartney's New


"Music : a backstage pass to the soul"
Post #240237
Posted 20 October 2013 14:15


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Thats a great review Noblebones Hope I did not sound too negative before. You are quite right with what you say.
Post #240240
Posted 20 October 2013 14:16


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Sorry Pippin posted it !
Post #240241
Posted 20 October 2013 21:08


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Pippin (20/10/2013)
Entertainment Focus think it's one of the top ten albums of the year:

[url=http://www.entertainment-focus.com/music-review/james-blunt-moon-landing-album-review/]


Pip Ellwood is a great supporter of James' work so I expected to read a positive review from him. He also knows quite well James' fans: "Blunt fortunately has a solid enough fanbase that supports his every move."...

Entertainment Focus
Posted on October 19, 2013 By Pip Ellwood
4/5

James Blunt may be one of the most successful British male artists of the last 10 years but he doesn’t get the recognition he deserves for it. Often dismissed by music critics, Blunt fortunately has a solid enough fanbase that supports his every move. After the huge success of debut album Back To Bedlam which was released in 2004 and follow-up All The Lost Souls in 2007, Blunt experienced a dip in commercial success with his third album Some Kind of Trouble in 2010. The success of new album Moon Landing is looking more assured though with lead single Bonfire Heart having already charted in the UK Top 10 giving Blunt his best-charting single since 2007 hit 1973.

The majority of Moon Landing was produced by Tom Rothrock, who produced Blunt’s debut album Back to Bedlam. Whilst writing for the record, Blunt worked with Steve Robson, Claude Kelly, Steve Mac and Ryan Tedder to name a few, with Tedder producing and co-writing lead single Bonfire Heart. That track is something a little different for Blunt giving him a more stripped-back and folky sound than we’ve heard before. Obviously it’s a sound that suits him well with radio taking to the track and its impressive chart performance.

Moon Landing opens with the sound of a motorbike whizzing by before a gentle piano melody leads into first track Face The Sun. The low-key start to the record feels intentional with Blunt grabbing your attention with his simplicity and his distinctive quavering vocal. Some critics will have a field day pulling apart the lyrics but we found them genuinely moving as Blunt tells a lover that their relationship is over and they should just move on. Halfway through the track drums and electric guitar kick in transforming the track and giving it an epic sound you simply don’t expect.

Now he’s grabbed our attention, what else has Mr Blunt got up his sleeve? After a few listens through the record it seems quite a lot actually. Whilst the album is undoubtedly a James Blunt record, it sees him exploring his musical vocabulary and experimenting with sounds we’ve not heard from him before. One of the early standouts is Satellites which marries pop sensibilities with singer-songwriter traits for one of the catchiest tracks on the record. Piano ballad Miss America is an emotive moment as Blunt pays tribute to the late great Whitney Houston. Musically the song reminds us a little of Wisemen but lyrically it couldn’t be more different.

On the mid-tempo Always Hate Me Blunt sings, ‘I never meant to hurt you, it’s just something I do, I guess it’s not a good excuse, and she will always hate me, no matter what I say.’ Obviously the song is about a relationship gone south but is it also Blunt commenting on his womanising ways which were well-documented in Peter Hardy’s 2011 book Different Country, Same State: On the Road with James Blunt? The autobiographical lyrics continue on The Only One which finds Blunt appealing to a lover begging for forgiveness. Come on Blunty, don’t be too hard on yourself; we all make mistakes!

One of the strongest songs on the record is the shimmering guitar melody of Bones. The slow building track features confessional lyrics as it builds into an explosive chorus. The track definitely has a commercial edge so don’t be too surprised if it is chosen as a single in the near future. Postcards sees Blunt borrowing a bit of Jack Johnson’s sunshine, and his ukulele, and is a surprising chirpy moment from the often introspective singer.

Moon Landing is an album with many layers and sounds. It’s definitely Blunt’s most musically diverse release to date and he has a renewed confidence that was perhaps not as evident on his last album. We don’t care what anyone says about James Blunt, we think he’s a fantastic talent and he’s one of the few male artists in the UK that pours his heart into his lyrics. Moon Landing is a solid record and one that we’ll be listening to a lot in the coming months. Whilst other critics will no doubt find some way to bash the record, we’re going to be putting it into our Top 10 albums of the year.
Post #240289
Posted 20 October 2013 22:05


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I post the full text to the reviews already mentioned in this thread. Just in case they disappear or links don't work later. I know some of them should not have been written.

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/oct/17/james-blunt-moon-landing-review

Caroline Sullivan
The Guardian, Thursday 17 October 2013
2/5

Introducing James Blunt's new single, Bonfire Heart, on last Sunday's Radio 1 chart show, Jameela Jamil suggested he was "the most hated man in pop". That's debatable – Bonfire Heart is actually his biggest hit in years – but his continued success defies analysis. His fourth album is Blunt at his Bluntest: though he claims to have aimed for rawness and spontaneity, it's not so easy to leave your comfort zone, and the music stays within familiar soft-rock parameters. Heart to Heart may have a speeded-up beat, and Bones may be an unexpectedly bracing crack at a club track, but Bonfire Heart's semi-acoustic AOR is more typical. That last song does at least have the advantage of a jaunty melody; when Blunt slows down and meanders, there's altogether too much focus on his weedy voice. And weedy it really is, spoiling even the nuggets of honesty that would otherwise make you warm to him, such as this: "I've never been a beautiful boy/ Never liked the sound of my own voice/ Wasn't cool when I was in my teens."

~~~

http://www.standard.co.uk/goingout/music/album-reviews-october-2013-8859042.html

Evening Standard
4/5

As he’s impossibly posh, a former army captain and the antidote to the cutting-edge, it’s easy to take potshots at James Blunt. It’s also the lazy option and, more crucially, it’s never been borne out by his albums. His fourth is an attempt to re-capture the spontaneity and perhaps the hunger of his first. Like Back to Bedlam, Moon Landing was recorded in Los Angeles with producer Tom Rothrock, while Blunt stayed with his former patron Carrie Fisher. There are simpering and clichéd moments (Blue on Blue drowns in weedy self-pity), but, similarly, there’s craft akin to The National or Bright Eyes in the thumping Satellites, unashamed pop on Postcards and Bonfire Heart, while Miss America is a mostly mawk-free take on Whitney Houston’s demise. And the cold-eyed, autobiographical Bones is his finest moment since Wisemen showed there was more to him than You’re Beautiful. Whisper it soft, but James Blunt is OK.

John Aizlewood

~~~

http://www.timeout.com/london/music/james-blunt-moon-landing-album-review

No surprises here: Blunty's as glib, polished and gently tuneful as ever
By Nick Levine Thu Oct 17 2013
2/5

These days it’s hard not to warm to James Blunt, who takes each blow on the chin – and then tweets it to to his 200,000 followers, often with a playful quip. ‘Somewhere in here there’s a compliment,’ he recently noted in response to the tweet: ‘Just heard a song, liked it & then found out its James Blunt. Sum1 give me a lobotomy.’

It’s a shame, then, that the 39-year-old former army man continues to make such mundane music. He’s said that ‘Moon Landing’, his fourth studio effort and first since 2010, is ‘a much more personal album, and also quite back to basics’ – neither of which really holds true. ‘Bones’ includes the confession that Blunt ‘never liked the sound of my own voice’ (yeah yeah, he’s not the only one) and ‘Always Hate Me’ is a pretty raw post-break-up tune, but more typical are the glib observations of a song like ‘Satellites’, on which Blunt informs us that ‘Life’s just a dream / Who the hell knows what it means?’ And when he tries to write a ‘Candle In The Wind’ for the late, great Whitney Houston – a song called ‘Miss America’ – he can only come up with clunky lines like ‘did the make-up ever make up for the pain behind your eyes?’ Ugh.

Likewise, although it has a couple of stripped down numbers, ‘Moon Landing’ mainly contains polished and professionally tuneful mum-pop songs with echoes of… well, lots of stuff that sells: Mumford & Sons on lead single ‘Bonfire Heart’, Coldplay on ‘Face the Sun’ and ‘Heart to Heart’, Jason Mraz on ‘Postcards’. The album’s most interesting moment comes when ‘Bones’ accessorises its arena-sized hooks with guitar sounds nicked from The XX – but then again, Kelly Clarkson already did that on last year’s far superior ‘Stronger (What Doesn’t Kill You)’.

All in all, there’s no denying Blunt can craft a decent melody, and ‘Moon Landing’ isn’t a bad album really. It’s just much less fun than his Twitter feed.


Post #240291
Posted 20 October 2013 22:12


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http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/music/reviews/album-review-james-blunt-moon-landing-custardatlantic-8887390.html

The Independent
Andy Gill, Friday 18 October 2013
2/5

Presumably to arrest a downward sales trajectory, James Blunt has re-enlisted Tom Rothrock, the producer of his successful earlier albums. But it's not the producer who needs changing; it's Blunt's own approach, which is increasingly threadbare – especially that little fluttery vocal tic that afflicts this album like a rash. To give him credit, Rothrock does a decent job of pumping life into Blunt's material, building a song such as "Bonfire Heart" from fingerstyle guitar opening to big, exultant conclusion by way of subtle accretions. Not that he has much to play with: maudlin plaints such as "Face the Sun" and "Sun on Sunday" are ironically bereft of light, while "Satellites", a clichéd lament for today's technologically mediated world, is simply insipid.

~~~

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/oct/20/james-blunt-moon-landing-review

Hermione Hoby
The Observer, Sunday 20 October 2013
1/5

Riding on as much good communal feeling as the guy who gets his acoustic guitar out at a party and starts playing Wonderwall, James Blunt is here, still, with his fourth album on which he continues to tread the well-worn soft-rock/folk-pop path. Single Bonfire Heart (the video for which features him riding around Wyoming and Idaho on a motorbike taking pictures of poor people) is very radio-friendly but, like every other song on Moon Landing, essentially drippy. Worst of all, though, is Blunt's distinctive voice, which sounds as if his testicles are being twisted.

~~~

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2465460/Albums-week-After-split-Russell-Brand-Katy-Perry-best-says-ADRIAN-THRILLS.html

Daily Mail
By ADRIAN THRILLS
PUBLISHED: 21:00 GMT, 17 October 2013

Verdict: Blunts gets back to basics
Rating: 4/5

Having rocked around the world with his last album, Some Kind Of Trouble, James Blunt set out this time to recapture the brooding quality of breakthrough hit You’re Beautiful.

To that end, he hooked up with his original producer Tom Rothrock, as well as his old landlady — the actress Carrie Fisher — lodging at her Beverly Hills home, as he did ten years ago when making his debut album Back To Bedlam.

The result is a fourth album that reconnects Blunt with his roots as a singer-songwriter, and puts the emphasis firmly back on his choirboy voice and confessional lyrics.

Drawn to the searing self-examination of singers like the late Elliott Smith, he lays his emotions bare on the likes of Always Hate Me.

The record has a stark, simple feel, although the 11 songs here have not been stripped to the bone: the arena-sized chorus of Satellites harks back to Peter Gabriel-era Genesis.

The highlight, though, is the heroic Miss America. Inspired by the death of Whitney Houston, it’s a Seventies-tinged rock ballad that sounds like Blunt’s answer to Elton John’s Candle In The Wind.
In going back to basics while reaching for the stars, Blunt has come up with his strongest set of songs yet.

Post #240292
Posted 20 October 2013 23:29


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http://metro.co.uk/2013/10/18/james-blunt-moon-landing-da-lata-fabiola-and-new-orleans-funk-vol-3-new-albums-4150109/

Metro.co.uk
By John Lewis and Siobhan Murphy
Friday 18 Oct 2013
3/5

James Blunt’s fourth album deploys some surprisingly violent military metaphors.

‘I throw in a hand grenade and tell you how I really feel for you,’ he warbles on Postcards. ‘Your love is like a soldier/loyal till you die’ he whispers on Bonfire Heart, while the final track warns us that he’s ‘coming under fire’.

It reminds us that the former Captain Blunt has made that rare switch from trained killer to soppy balladeer, which is either the sign of a well-rounded fellow or a chap who needs to find a middle ground between warrior and maudlin milksop.

However, the heartbroken, piano-led ballads work better than the uptempo songs: the Whitney Houston tribute Miss America, the Elton John-ish Blue On Blue, and the hymn-like Sun On Sunday all work quite well.

Even Blunt’s warbly, old-lady voice can’t ruin them.

~~~

Touring the world for 14 months is not exactly disappearing from the music scene in my book. Nevertheless, it's a positive review.

http://www.hitthefloor.com/music/review-james-blunt-moon-landing-album/

Hit The Floor
Reviewer: Hannah Dix
October 19, 2013
8/10

After disappearing from the music scene for many years, James Blunt has returned with a new album. ‘Moon Landing‘ was produced with friend Tom Rothrock, who also worked on James’ album, ‘Back To Bedlam‘, released in 2005 . After criticism and the belief in most people’s minds that he had failed to release anything decent after ‘You’re Beautiful‘, it is refreshing to have new tunes from pop’s best ex-army officer.

First song, ‘Face The Sun‘, portrays a rollercoaster of emotions. Beginning and ending with a slow piano melody and an electric instrumental at its core, the tune sets up the rest of the album. It is followed by upbeat love song ‘Satellites‘, which has more of a light, summery feel.

The next two tracks are about our best love organ (by this, I mean our heart). The first single to be taken from the album, ‘Bonfire Heart‘, reached #6 in the UK Charts, and is a folk-rock number, co-written with OneRepublic‘s frontman, Ryan Tedder. Ringing of Mumford & Sons, its fast tempo, catchy and uplifting feel flows well into fourth track ‘Heart to Heart‘ which also seems to be looking back at first love. As James sings ‘You and I won’t part til we die. You should know we see eye to eye, heart to heart’ over a simple clapping rhythm, you can’t help but begin to dance.

Moving in a slightly different direction, next track ‘Miss America‘ was inspired by the death of the late Whitney Houston last year. With its sad, rock sound, the song seems like it was written to be the soundtrack for an unreleased film. The following two tracks, ‘The Only One‘ and ‘Sun On Sunday‘ continue this darker theme. ‘The Only One’ has a more anthemic punch to it, but nonetheless seems to portray raw emotion about a break-up. ‘Sun On Sunday’ is a heartbreakingly stunning song, with nothing but James’ dulcet tones alongside the piano.

Eighth track ‘Bones‘ is a big electric rock number that sounds as if it was made to be performed live in a large venue, with the tempo building up and dropping throughout. This is followed by ‘Always Hate Me‘, unsurprisingly about an ex-girlfriend and lyrics such as ‘I never meant to hurt you’ fill the song with regret and raw emotion.

‘Postcards‘ is an album highlight, as the lines brilliantly reflect James’ happiness at his chance to write an album which satisfies him on a personal level. His spoken desire to ‘express myself simply and honestly’ is mirrored with lyrics such as ‘I’m sending a postcard, I don’t care who sees what I’ve said’. This feel-good track, somewhat resembling Train‘s ‘Hey Soul Sister‘ is succeeded by final song ‘Blue on Blue‘. Tainted with sadness, the love song concludes what James describes as a “much more personal album”.

After announcing in 2012 his wish to retire, it seemed James Blunt had left his music career behind. However, his work on this album has allowed him to create a wonderful pop product, proving his time is not up yet. I could easily listen to the album from start to finish many times – a strong feat for an artist who was practically kicked to the curb with his last record.

Post #240299
Posted 20 October 2013 23:42


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These two are hard to swallow, but when you see a so-called critic giving any credibility to the "retirement announcement", it says a lot on their own credibility and how they document their text.

http://www.virginmedia.com/music/reviews/james-blunt-moon-landing.php

Virgin Media
Album review by Ian Gittins
2/5

Let us consider the James Blunt conundrum.

When the phenomenal success of You're Beautiful made his debut Back To Bedlam the best selling album of the last decade, the former Army sergeant reacted as any sane person would: he moved to Ibiza and dedicated any downtime going to non-stop relaxing, entertaining and partying, to the extent of opening an intimate club called Everybody's Beautiful beneath his villa.

It sounds an entirely laudable lifestyle, but begs the question of why Blunt keeps breaking away from it to record fresh chunks of his dreary, limpid music. It certainly yields him diminishing returns: every Blunt album has sold considerably less than its predecessor, with his last record, 2010's Some Kind of Trouble, representing a staggering 90% sales drop on Back To Bedlam.

Now he trundles along with his fourth offering, which he claims to be his most personal album to date but which to any sentient ears sounds exactly the same as all the others. Blunt's musical formula doesn't change: pastel piano plinking, muted minor-key acoustic guitar chords, and his timorous warble crooning mildly melancholic words with the soul and depth of a post-it note.

Thus Bonfire Heart finds him murmuring "I've been putting out fires all my life" while sounding the ultimate damp squib. The hapless, soggy Miss America sees him struck by the brainwave that being a beauty queen is maybe a bit, you know, superficial: 'Did the make-up never make up for the pain behind your eyes?' Worst of all is Postcards, an unforgivably weedy excursion into white reggae next to which even Newton Faulkner would sound like Bob Marley.

His muse is stuck on repeat, his following is falling away – maybe it is time for James Blunt to decide to spend all his days from now on partying in Everybody's Beautiful. Here's hoping.

~~~

http://www.theartsdesk.com/new-music/cd-james-blunt-moon-landing

The Art Desk
by Russ Coffey
Sunday, 20 October 2013

His first post-'retirement' album - but was it worth it?

Few artists make critics wince like James Blunt. One described his biggest hit, “You’re Beautiful”, for instance, as being like “Japanese water torture”. Another said Blunt made him want to “rip his ears off”. Still, the erstwhile army officer doesn’t seem to care what critics say. And why should he? Not only have his songs brought him platinum discs, they’ve also helped pay for houses in Ibiza and Switzerland. He may be less popular than before but the question still remains: with such a big audience what exactly are the critics' issues? And is Moon Landing going to change their minds?

Blunt's mother once opined that some people are simply jealous of her son's posh background. But, in reality, those who knock JB's music are probably less concerned with his Harrow education than his inability to convey any interesting emotions. On this count, Moon Landing is little different from anything that has come before. Music aficionados will generally tolerate all manner of stylistic peculiarity if they feel they are receiving a real slice of someone's soul. Blunt may have an unusual, thin, helium voice but lyrically he is about as convincing as that pet dog who was recently substituted for a lion in a Chinese zoo.

Sample lines from Moon Landing include the bland "It’s hard to find the one/ But in time all flowers turn to face the sun”; and the meaningless “Your mouth is a revolver firing bullets in the sky”. Even with Tom Rothrock's production, they come wrapped in saccharine melodies, delivered with smug earnestness.

Blunt says that this is a “much more personal album” but if only it really sounded like he had problems greater than Waitrose running out of Balsamic vinegar. The majority of Moon Landing just comes across like a diluted mixture of James Morrison, Ben Howard and Ed Sheeran. Prior to its recording, Blunt had teased journalists by suggesting he was going into musical retirement. The results hardly seem worth the elaborate ruse.

Post #240301
Posted 21 October 2013 00:11
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wow that is not a pleasant read indeed! But on the other hand, we shouldn't be bothered by this! Until they are able to give some proper reasons why this album isn't brilliant, we can't care!
Their writing style and the words they use make them come across like either jealous, frustrated with their own lives or having a bad day!
(in fact what have James' bar, his different houses etc. got to do with the quality of his album???)
Whatever it is, it's obvious that the millions of fans James has, proofs them wrong!
Thanks for posting all these reviews, jbfan! Was nice to read some good ones too!
Post #240306
Posted 21 October 2013 15:24


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I think quite pretensious of him ( James) and us (fans ) finding "Moon Landing" album the best album out there  and the best he made so far.

There always be people who don't like his work / music/ voice ,and judge.

We can't please everybody!

Sometimes the worst reviews are the best.

Maybe allow James work harder and harder in pursuit what is considered good music to the critics. or maybe not!

I agree in some review points  like this one :

"Likewise, although it has a couple of stripped down numbers, ‘Moon Landing’ mainly contains polished and professionally tuneful mum-pop songs with echoes of… well, lots of stuff that sells: Mumford & Sons on lead single ‘Bonfire Heart’, Coldplay on ‘Face the Sun’ and ‘Heart to Heart’, Jason Mraz on ‘Postcards’. The album’s most interesting moment comes when ‘Bones’ accessorises its arena-sized hooks with guitar sounds nicked from The XX – but then again, Kelly Clarkson already did that on last year’s far superior ‘Stronger (What Doesn’t Kill You)’.


Other ones are completely rubish:

Like one that said he was taking pictures to poor people on "Bonfire Heart" video.

WTF? How did he knows if people there are rich or poor and in what that contributes to make a good video !?

Rubish!


I do agree that much of his music on this album sounds in same register that the last others.

There's no great innovation. There is many resemblances of other musicians and other musics in many songs.

 I only hear some innovation on the song " Always Hate Me" ,which, btw, it's my favorite on the album.It's outstanding!

I'm pretty sure he felt the pressure and the stress to make an album like the first one( Back to Bedlam) and therefore to reach again the success of big hits like YAB or GML or High... !!!

 

 

 

Love desperately again, capture a unique moment again and write/ compose straight from you heart  with honesty...and you will see what happens !

Post #240379
Posted 21 October 2013 18:58


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I love when someone thinks I stole a guitar part from a band I've never even heard of. :/
Post #240410
Posted 21 October 2013 19:31


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mattchait (21/10/2013)
I love when someone thinks I stole a guitar part from a band I've never even heard of. :/

You never even heard of ??? WOW ! I will make it easy for you. And don't tell me if you can't find similarities:

Kelly Clarkson://http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xn676-fLq7I

I think, you guys are too much time locked on studios doing music and don't listen radios charts. Must be that !  

Post #240415
Posted 21 October 2013 19:35


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"‘Bones’ accessorises its arena-sized hooks with guitar sounds nicked from The XX"

never heard of it/them.
Post #240416
Posted 21 October 2013 19:44


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mattchait (21/10/2013)
"‘Bones’ accessorises its arena-sized hooks with guitar sounds nicked from The XX"

never heard of it/them.

Ahhhh... that! Never heard of them/it either.

Ok, he was bad on that one and in Postcards too ( Jason Mraz ???).

What come to my ears in this song is the sound of ukulele and the song " somewhere over the rainbow"  

Post #240421
Posted 21 October 2013 20:03
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I think nowadays it is a terrible mentality to talk down everything and a bloody habit to discuss almost everything to death like to dissect something or someone until everything is fragmented and any interest, charm or magic get lost.

And most people who use to do this have no distinguished skills, made never the experiences of long lasting hard training and are not able to make something really special or creative (like in arts, sports, music, science etc.).

I don't think it is his best album. I think, it is the best one that he could produce in his present life based on his current personality and the grown experiences and professionalism in making music.

B2B was the best album at his beginning.

ATLS was the best album which could follow on his first one.

SKOT - in my opinion - was exactly the right album, which he could produce when he had chased away some ghosts of his past. 

I almost never find CDs of an artist packed with songs which I love all. All his 4 albums without exception contain songs I like all listening.

Post #240426
Posted 21 October 2013 20:24
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jbfan132 (20/10/2013)
crooning mildly melancholic words with the soul and depth of a post-it note.


Personally I've always found post-it notes to have amazing hidden depths......

(What utter rubbish some people write!!!)

Post #240428
Posted 22 October 2013 20:28


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Just seen the Digital Spy review it is not too bad can anyone link it please.
Post #240520
Posted 22 October 2013 20:34


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There is one from The National too.
Post #240524
Posted 23 October 2013 13:40


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Sorry, I have to yawn on this one.

"And, let’s face it, with a loyal army of fans, and three successful albums behind him, Blunt could, no doubt, care less for snotty music reviewers..."

Yep, and James' fans will always have the last word, no offense to the music critics.

http://www.musicomh.com/reviews/albums/james-blunt-moon-landing

By John Murphy | 22 October 2013

There are easy targets, there’s shooting fish in a barrel, and there’s James Blunt. Ever since the former army captain appeared to take over the world by telling us all about how his life is brilliant and an unnamed ‘angel’ on the Tube was beautiful, his name seems to have become the musical byword for the colour beige and treated with a fair amount of disdain.

Which is a shame, as he seems like a nice enough chap in interviews and has taken to displaying a winningly self-effacing attitude on Twitter of late. And, let’s face it, with a loyal army of fans, and three successful albums behind him, Blunt could, no doubt, care less for snotty music reviewers (he has, after all, had to face far more dangerous enemies in the past). Besides, it all seems rather futile now to just lazily slag off James Blunt – he is, and has been from the beginning of his career, pretty much critic-proof.

Moon Landing, his fourth album, sees him link up again with producer Tom Rothrock (who helmed his debut record Back To Bedlam), and is hailed as his most personal album yet. And while it won’t win over anyone yet to be convinced by the Blunt charm, it will certainly satisfy his many fans. It will, though, also give fuel to his many detractors, for Moon Landing is, for the most part, a sadly formulaic effort.

There’s that voice, for a start. To some, the sound of a man with his testicles being slowly squeezed by a vice, to others something far more horrific, Blunt’s falsetto is as high and tremulous as ever. After a couple of tracks you get strangely used to it, like a musical version of Stockholm Syndrome, yet it’s impossible not to wince when he goes for the high notes on songs like Miss America, a well-intentioned yet ultimately rather mawkish tribute to Whitney Houston.

To be fair though, Blunt knows how to write a pretty melody. Face The Sun is a quite nice opener, based on a poignant piano riff that builds up and up, and recent single Bonfire Heart has a stirring nu-folk arrangement that will appeal to anyone who’s a bit sick of Ho Hey by The Lumineers (which is, needless to say, everyone in the entire world). There’s also the genuinely touching Bones, with self-deprecating lyrics like “I have never been a beautiful boy, never liked the sound of my own voice” which powers along on a guitar riff that U2‘s The Edge would be proud of.

Elsewhere though, it all becomes a bit insipid and grey. Always Hate Me is, unsurprisingly enough, all about a bad relationship break-up with lyrics like “I never meant to hurt you, it’s just something I do, I guess it’s not a good excuse”. It’s presumably meant to be achingly personal and self-lacerating, but just comes across as a bit whiny. At least that provokes a reaction though, unlike the bland Satellites and the reggae-tinged Jack Johnson soundalike of Postcards.

Moon Landing will sell shedloads, and no doubt be appearing in many a Christmas stocking in a couple of months’ time. There’s certainly a market for anodyne, unthreatening, middle of the road pop, and Blunt appeals to that market very successfully. Yet those who look for music to move them, be it through the feet, heart or brain, probably won’t be surprised to find that there won’t be too much to appeal to them here.

Post #240588
Posted 23 October 2013 13:56


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http://www.digitalspy.ca/music/review/a525195/james-blunt-moon-landing-album-review-does-he-defy-the-doubters.html

James Blunt 'Moon Landing' album review: Does he defy the doubters?

Published Monday, Oct 21 2013
By Lewis Corner
3/5

Is there anyone in the music business more critically bashed than James Blunt? Ever since soaring to global fame back in 2005 with 'You're Beautiful', the former Army officer has faced a major backlash for his popularity, despite continuing to achieve healthy chart success. It's almost become a stigma he will never be able to escape, and rather amusingly, he occasionally likes to poke fun at his detractors.

It's a shame more of this humor hasn't made it on to his fourth collection Moon Landing, which underwent the usual ridicule before it was even available on shelves. Lead single 'Bonfire Heart' hears him team up once again with resident hit-maker Ryan Tedder. Its uplifting folk-tinged chorus has seen it scale the charts to become one of his most popular tracks in years, despite a snubbing from BBC Radio 1's playlist. It's very clearly the highlight on Moon Landing, but Blunt does offer up a few more toe-tappers.

'Heart To Heart' marks his first collaboration with producer Robopop (Lana Del Rey, Ke$ha) that results in a jaunty, clap-happy ditty, while 'The Only One' is led by trickling piano and bounding beats that echoes the successful formula of his debut Back To Bedlam. Unfortunately, the album doesn't escape a fleshing of sleepy MOR, from Whitney Houston tribute 'Miss America' failing to surpass its clichéd lyrics, to the blandly obvious critique of modern society and technology on 'Satellites'.

That said, those moments are counterbalanced by the surprisingly bouncy 'Bones', which needs to be pencilled in for a future single release. "I have never been a beautiful boy/ Never liked the sound of my own voice," he admits on the pulsing pop number, before the chorus actually manages to induce a slight adrenaline rush. As well as injecting a spark of vibrancy into Moon Landing, it reminds us that James Blunt really isn't as bad as people say he is.

Post #240590
Posted 23 October 2013 14:03


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Thanks Alikerstina for pointing me these 2 reviews. I was too busy listening the CD last night to perform any searches.

http://www.thenational.ae/arts-culture/music-reviews/music-review-moon-landing-by-james-blunt

The National (United Arab Emirates)
James McNair
October 21, 2013

James Blunt Moon Landing (Atlantic) ⋆⋆

Midway through Face the Sun, the opening track on James Blunt’s fourth album, a thought occurs: this is precisely the kind of song that shows such as The X Factor have playing in the background when they want to put viewers through the emotional wringer. Moon Landing’s would-be tearjerkers with telegraphed choruses keep coming, too, and never more transparently than on Miss America, a song about the passing of Whitney Houston. “There’s a new voice singing in heaven’s choir tonight,” offers Blunt in that high, fluttering voice of his. The singer-songwriter and former British army officer is here reunited with Tom Rothrock, the producer behind the irritatingly ubiquitous hit You’re Beautiful. Blunt is also joined by at least nine co-writers, all of them seemingly tasked with the job of helping a particularly saccharine kind of lightning to strike twice. Though The Only One and Sun on Sunday are executed well enough, they sound like composites of a million other lovelorn pop songs. The overall impression is of a work whose attempts to express Everyman emotions seem too familiar, too contrived.

Post #240593
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